Scrovegni Chapel Diary

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One of the highlights of my day trip from Vicenza to Padua was seeing the Scrovegni Chapel, which had been decorated with amazing frescoes by Giotto di Bondone during the 14th century. I was familiar with Giotto’s masterful work. I had toured the Basilica of San Francesco in Assisi several times and had been captivated by his masterful creations there.

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Built for Enrico Scrovegni, the chapel, christened Our Lady of the Annunciation, had once been connected to a palace, but it was demolished in 1827. The name of the architect is not known. We had to follow a path outside of the impressive and comprehensive art gallery near the chapel, which stood on its own. It was raining heavily and immediately after taking shelter inside the documentation room, we saw a short, instructive film about the chapel.

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Upon entering the chapel itself, I was overwhelmed by the 38 panels of frescoes covering three walls on three levels. The star-studded ceiling vault in its brilliant blue hue was one of the first features to capture my attention. The blue was so vibrant. Scenes from the Old Testament abounded. Allegorical figures of the Seven Virtues and Vices made prominent appearances. I inwardly celebrated with Mary’s parents when the Virgin was born in a modest cottage. In the Annunciation, I noticed the chiaroscuro effect on Mary’s robe. A comet stood out in the Adoration of the Wise Kings.

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In the Flight into Egypt, Mary was holding Jesus so tightly, so protectively while Joseph glanced behind him at the family for which he felt a fierce love. The white bodies of the dead babies were chilling in the Slaughter of the Innocents. In the Kiss of Betrayal, I could feel my body tense as I noticed the look between Judas and Christ. In the Weeping over the Body Christ, a solitary tree with bare branches captured my attention. As an architectural buff, the six Gothic windows in the Pentecost panel intrigued me.

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The Vices and Virtues also made a lasting impression. Ire was violently tearing her robe apart, exposing her chest, and I saw a serpent slivering out of the mouth of Envy.

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My favorite part of the frescoes was the Last Judgment. Christ, of course, took up a central position. Giotto even put himself in the fresco. Enrico presents the Virgin Mary with a model of the chapel. Then there is Hell, with a dancing, consuming fire as the tormented, writhing figures descend toward Lucifer, a monster feeding upon the damned. I could feel the torment of the figures.

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Soon, though, it was time to leave, and it was difficult to say goodbye to such a masterful work. I could have stared at Giotto’s magnificent frescoes for hours, analyzing each one. I had felt the same way in the basilica in Assisi.

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I would see more impressive sights in Padua, such as the Basilica of the Saint, a vast structure dedicated to Saint Anthony and the stunning Hall of Justice. Still, whenever I think of my time in Padua, the first images that comes to mind are the riveting frescoes in this chapel.

Tracy A. Burns is a writer, proofreader and editor in Prague.

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